Monthly Archives: July 2021

By Barry Dragon, Vice President of EH&A/MGT Over the past 18 months, much has changed in the world; and even more specifically in K-12 education. Where a mere year ago many school districts were looking at the financial impacts of declining enrollment combined with an anticipated $54 Billion deficit at the state level, a year…

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Public school enrollment in 2020-21 fell by 3% compared to the previous year, marking the largest decline since the start of this century, according to preliminary data from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics. As anticipated, the declines were mostly concentrated in pre-k, which saw a 22% decrease, and kindergarten, which…

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School districts should think creatively but responsibly when planning to spend federal COVID-19 relief funds over the next several years in order to show appropriators that the money allocated was justified. Investments in ed tech, for example, could include new programs that extend and enhance core subject learning, as well as exposure to the arts,…

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Austin Beutner, now gone as superintendent of the nation’s second-largest school district, has been alternately praised, denounced and, finally, thanked for his three years as a “crisis manager.” From the get-go, the Los Angeles Unified school board’s decision to hire Beutner in May 2018 was controversial. He had a background in business, investment banking, politics…

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One observer thinks there needs to be carrot and stick incentives to get people back to work. As businesses are opening back up, they’re running into a problem. It isn’t easy to find labor. While politicians, business executives and policymakers can debate root causes, it’s becoming a more significant issue. In the construction industry, which…

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Employers are telling us that creativity, persuasion, collaboration, adaptability and emotional intelligence are the most-in-demand skills today. But children are growing in precisely the opposite direction. They are less mentally healthy, less empathetic and less creative than they were at the beginning of the decade. We have a rising imbalance between the supply of creative,…

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Senate and White House discussions are currently focusing on a Senate bipartisan agreement providing $579 million for roads, bridges, highways, public transportation, rail, ports, airports, and broadband. It does not include American Jobs Plan school, day care, and community college infrastructure. The tentative plan does have funding for electrification of school buses, removal of lead…

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Secretary of State Shirley Weber certified the recall petition on July 1st and sent notification to the Lieutenant Governor. Shortly after receiving the notification from the Secretary of State’s Office, the Lieutenant Governor issued a proclamation declaring that the special gubernatorial recall election will take place on September 14th. To expedite the recall process, the…

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Survey finds agreement that political and racial tensions have risen. Despite perceptions of the public’s widespread unhappiness with the slow reopening of California’s schools last spring, most voters surveyed, including parents, gave the highest marks in a decade of polling to the state’s public schools in general and their schools in particular. However, on most…

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Families want distance learning to include students with health worries but with better options than what existed pre-pandemic. With the pandemic still reverberating across California, districts must offer students an independent study option this fall, but with improvements to what was offered during the shutdown and pre-pandemic. For the 2021-22 school year only, school districts…

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