Monthly Archives: November 2019

In its 2019 State of the States report, EducationSuperHighway declares mission accomplished on closing the connectivity gap, with 99{310f4324ad65b0a2030a48dd153b38f905c81f5512720fdadc65be8f0797b958} of the nation’s schools now having affordable and reliable broadband connections at a minimum speed of 100 kbps and with a “clear path” to scaling bandwidth for future needs. Despite the “mission accomplished” declaration, administrators and…

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Stepping into the role after a troubled iPad rollout, Sophia Mendoza has successfully restructured classroom tech initiatives in the nation’s second-largest district. When one of the country’s most ambitious classroom technology rollouts culminated in an FBI investigation that branded Los Angeles Unified School District home of a major “IT scandal” in 2013, Mendoza entered the…

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The U.S. construction industry, like agriculture and manufacturing, has a reputation for relying on undocumented workers. That’s mostly because legal workers simply aren’t available, and cost much more to employ when they are. The Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is tasked with ensuring that employers maintain complete I-9 records, and the agency conducts audits throughout…

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From phishing to ransomware, K–12 IT leaders have plenty to worry about. Ransomware, phishing and distributed denial of service attacks tend to be the main assaults perpetrated by outside hackers. But students also may contribute to the problem. Luckily, there are just as many solutions that can help. Click here for the full article…

Advocates of increased school surveillance often say that even if a few inaccuracies arise, ultimately the benefits of increased safety outweigh the costs. But whose safety are we actually talking about? When schools introduce these technologies, they open the door to labeling students’ normal thoughts, words and movements as dangerous—and potentially involving law enforcement. A…

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A massive retaining wall inside the Point Loma High School stadium has broken away from the hillside it is holding back. The wall, approximately 20 feet high and over 100 feet in length, was built in 1960, according to Kelly Lowry, PLHS vice-principal, whose responsibilities include the physical structures on campus. School district personnel have…

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